How I’m finding things with my motorized wheelchair

Getting a motorized chair has been the best thing that has happened to me for a while! Being able to go out on trips and outings alone without having to rely on family members to drop me off, pick me up, push my chair, is just … amazing, to be honest. I forgot how much I’d come to rely on others to get out of the house and having regained a bit of freedom has felt really good.

Of course, I still do rely on my family but it’s not a terrible thing. Like many disabled people, I do have many moments of feeling that I’m a burden on family, even though they are happy to help. It’s just nice that if I fancy going to the library, for example, when I’m home alone, providing I have the spoons, I can go without having to wait for transport and a guaranteed pick-up.

This week I started my Masters degree in biomedical science, and without the motorized chair, I simply couldn’t have done it at all. I commute about 60 miles, and as my twin sister, who is my main caregiver, works, then of course she can’t be around for me all the time. I was managing to volunteer on my own using the manual chair (with my mum dropping me off and picking me up at the bus stop), as getting off the bus at the hospital where I work and getting into the department is all flat and fairly smooth, but I was still doing more damage to my shoulder by propelling myself. Getting myself around the city for uni was simply something that couldn’t be done.

With the motorized chair, I have been managing much better than I’d imagined, including having early mornings and 7:00am trains. To be able to get about and do things without so much struggle and pain is great and I’d forgotten what it was like, to be honest. Even when someone was pushing my manual chair, it quickly became very uncomfortable and the pain after a full day in it is unreal, but the motorized chair is much more comfortable for quite a long time.

Of course, there are still access issues, because, you know, that’s how the world is. Some of the positives are that I’m managing on the city buses, even if there’s not a lot of space to get round the corner past the driver’s booth, nor to maneuver into the wheelchair space if the bus is busy, but actually I think I manage this better on my own than I did in the manual. The train service in Scotland is pretty impressive compared to stories I hear elsewhere; I only have to book 6 or so hours in advance for assistance, and actually most of the time, it’s o.k. to just turn up at the station and arrange a ramp. The staff have been excellent, and commuting isn’t turning out to be as frustrating as I’d thought.

Things are going well at uni too, especially as the new buildings of my faculty were specifically designed with wheelchair access in mind; the corridors are extra wide, the lab benches are adjustable, etc. I have a campus map with accessible routes and entrances to buildings, although on my first day I did have a chair lift that wasn’t working–honestly, it’s not even a surprise to me anymore, to be honest!

Anyway, I just wanted to say I’m getting on well. Different people have different needs and preferences, but with my conditions affecting my upper body as well, getting motorized has been the best option for me and I have no regrets! (Well, maybe I regret the heightened electricity bill from all the battery charging! :P)

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About wolfennacht

I'm a 25 year old disabled polyglot who mainly spends time writing novels and poetry, teaching myself languages, and reading too much. I use a wheelchair. I am currently a grad student in biomedical science. I mainly blog about my physical and mental illnesses and procrastinate writing on my crochet blog!
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